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Disability Discrimination Attorneys Fighting For Employees’ Rights in New York City, Philadelphia & New Jersey

Disability Discrimination Attorneys level the playing field for NY-NJ-PA disabled employees | Free Legal Consultation

The New York City, Philadelphia & New Jersey disability discrimination attorneys at the employment law firm of Derek T. Smith Law Group, PLLC offer hard-hitting legal representation for those suffering from disability discrimination in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. If you are being harassed, denied employment, or denied accommodations in the workplace for a disability, our New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey disability discrimination attorneys will provide effective and efficient legal counsel for your disability discrimination lawsuit.

New York City Disability Discrimination Attorneys | New York City Employment Discrimination Attorney | New Jersey Disability Discrimination Attorneys | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Manhattan | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in the Bronx | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Brooklyn | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Staten Island | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Queens | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in New York City | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Long Island City | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Maspeth | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Sunnyside | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Middle Village | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Woodside | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Ridgewood | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Astoria | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Jackson Heights | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in East Elmhurst | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Kings County | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in New York County | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Queens County | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Richmond County | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in New Jersey | Disability Discrimination Attorney in New Jersey | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Newark | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Jersey City | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Paterson | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Woodbridge | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Toms River | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Hamilton Township | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Clifton | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Trenton | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Camden | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Cherry Hill | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Passaic | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Old Bridge | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Bayonne | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Vineland | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in North Bergen | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Union | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Hoboken | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in West New York | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Perth Amboy | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in East Brunswick | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in West Orange | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Sayreville | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Hackensack | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Elizabeth | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Linden | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Atlantic City | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Long Branch | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Manalapan | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Rahway | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Bergenfield | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Paramus | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Point Pleasant Beach | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Weehawken | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Wildwood | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Livingston | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Edison | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Union City | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in East Orange | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in New Brunswick | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Pennsylvania | Disability Discrimination Attorney in New York City | Disability Discrimination in Pennsylvania | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Philadelphia | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Pittsburgh | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Allentown | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Erie | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Reading | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Upper Darby | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Scranton | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Bethlehem | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Bensalem | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Lancaster | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Lower Merion | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Abington | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Bristol | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Levittown | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Harrisburg | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Haverford | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Altoona | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in York | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in State College | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in Wilkes-Barre | NY-NJ-PA

Every working man and women in New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey, even those with disabilities, have the right to get a good job based on their skills and abilities. A disability should never prevent you from holding a position of employment for which you are qualified. A disability also should not give your employer and co-workers a free pass to discriminate against or harass you in your place of employment. Unfortunately, everyday handicapped individuals are being unfairly denied employment opportunities because of their disability. When a company infringes on your basic right to employment, our New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey disability discrimination attorneys are here to help you with your EEOC claim or disability discrimination lawsuit. Our disability discrimination lawyers offer a free consultation and never charge a fee unless we recover for you in your disability discrimination case.


What is Disability Discrimination in the Workplace? | EEOC Attorneys in New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey

Disability discrimination occurs in the workplace when an employer or other entity covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, as amended, or the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, treats a qualified individual with a disability who is an employee or applicant unfavorably because she has a disability. If you are disabled, it legally should not impact your ability to gain and maintain meaningful employment. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act and the New York Human Rights Law, employers cannot treat qualified individuals differently because of a handicap or disability, or perceived disability. Importantly, employers must provide “Reasonable Accommodations” to disabled individuals.

Unlawful discriminatory employment practices refer to discrimination in the hiring, firing, and the terms and conditions of employment, as well as job training. “Discrimination” also refers to harassment within the workplace. An employer cannot discriminate against any disabled person for requesting reasonable and legal medical leave or a reasonable accommodation.


The Americans with Disabilities Act | ADA Discrimination Attorneys in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia

Enacted in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits employment discrimination against individuals with disabilities. A person is considered “disabled” under the ADA if he or she meets one of three statutory requirements. First, he or she may have “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.” 42 U.S.C. § 12102(1)(A). Alternatively, he or she may have a record or be regarded as having such a disability. Thus, a person is “disabled,” within the meaning of the ADA if he or she has an impairment that actually substantially limits a major life activity, if there is a record that such a disability exists, or if the individual is perceived to have a disability, whether or not that disability severely limits a major life activity.

Given the above definition, any inquiry into an ADA claim will have two initial elements. First, the court must decide whether the claimed actual, recorded or regarded disability limits a major life activity. Second, if there is a limitation of a major life activity, the court must decide whether such limitation is “substantial.”
Major life activities are broken into two categories: tasks and functions. Tasks are defined to include “caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.” Functions, in turn, are defined as “including but not limited to, functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions.” Given these expansive (and non-exclusive) definitions, most ADA threshold inquiries will turn on whether the major life activity is substantially limited (rather than whether the limitation exists).
Under authority of the ADA, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has promulgated regulations to be used when determining whether a limitation of a major life activity is substantial. In this regard, the EEOC has directed that the phrase “‘substantially limits’ should be construed broadly in favor of expansive coverage to the maximum extent permitted by the terms of the ADA.”

To meet its broad definition of “substantially limits” the EEOC has explained that “impairment need not prevent, or significantly or severely restrict, the individual from performing a major life activity in order to be considered substantially limiting.” 29 C.F.R. § 1630.2(j). Furthermore, both the ADA and the implementing regulations recognize that an “episodic” limitation may qualify an individual as disabled under the statute. However, duration of an impairment is a consideration in determining whether the impairment is substantial. Thus, where an impairment is expected to last for a short period of time, it likely will have to be more severe than a normal impairment to qualify an individual as disabled. Put differently, an impairment may substantially limit a major life activity, even if the restriction is not significant or severe, and even if the restriction is in remission.
It is important to note that the foregoing standard for proving a disability under the ADA represents the effect of dramatic changes to the statute brought about by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAA). Accordingly, in many situations, recourse to case law decided before the 2008 amendments may be inappropriate or unwise. Consultation with an experienced and knowledge ADA attorney is strongly suggested.


New Jersey Law Against Discrimination | Disability Discrimination Lawyer in New Jersey | Free Consultation

The New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (N.J.S.A. 10:5-12) (LAD) makes it unlawful to treat people differently based on race discrimination, creed discrimination, color discrimination, national origin discrimination, nationality discrimination, ancestry discrimination, age discrimination, pregnancy discrimination, familial status, marital status, domestic partnership or civil union status, affectional or sexual orientation discrimination, gender identity or expression, atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait, genetic information, liability for military service, and mental or physical disability, perceived disability, and AIDS and HIV status. The LAD prohibits unlawful discrimination in employment, housing, places of public accommodation, credit and business contracts. Not all of the foregoing prohibited bases for discrimination are protected in all of these areas of activity. For example, familial status is only protected with respect to housing. The Division has promulgated regulations that explain that a place of public accommodation must make reasonable modifications to its policies, practices or procedures to ensure that people with disabilities have access to public places. The regulations also explain that under the LAD, these reasonable accommodations may include actions such as providing auxilliary aides and making physical changes to ensure paths of travel. If you feel you have been subjected to disability discrimination in New Jersey, contact one of our New Jersey Disability Discrimination Lawyers at the employment discrimination firm of the Derek Smith Law Group for a free consultation.


The New York Human Rights Law | Human Rights Law Attorney in New York City | No Fee Unless We Recover

In conjunction with the ADA, the New York Human Rights Law (HLR) also safeguards the rights of disabled persons in NYC. In general, the HLR offers a broader range of employee disability protections. The HLR applies to all public employees in addition to private employers with four or more workers. Employment agencies and labor unions are covered under the HLR.


What is the definition of disability in my NYC workplace? | ADA Lawyer in NYC-NJ-PA

The ADA and HRL define disability slightly differently. Depending on your specific circumstances, your NYC discrimination attorney may decide to apply either law to your case.

Under the ADA, you have a disability if you meet one of these requirements:

  • a physical or mental impairment that “substantially limits” one or more “major life activities”;
  • a record of such an impairment; or
  • you are regarded as having such an impairment.

Under the HRL, a “handicap or disability” means you meet one of these requirements:

  • a physical, mental or medical impairment resulting from anatomical, physiological, genetic or neurological conditions which prevents the exercise of a normal bodily function or is demonstrable by medically accepted clinical or laboratory diagnostic techniques; or
  • a record of such an impairment; or
  • a condition regarded by others as such an impairment.

According to the New York Human Rights Law, you do not have to show that your handicap substantially limits major life activities.

Examples of covered disability discrimination conditions

There are a wide range of EEOC diseases, disorders, mental illnesses, and physical impairments covered by both the Americans with Disabilities Act, ADA Amendments Act and HRL, including:

·        Diabetes·        Cancer
·        Epilepsy·        Intellectual Disabilities.

In addition, regulatory guidance also lists the following conditions as disabilities:

·        Partial or Completely Missing Limbs·       Autism
·       Mobility Impairments / wheel chair use·        Cerebral Palsy
·        HIV Infection·        Multiple sclerosis
·        Muscular dystrophy·        Major depressive disorder
·        Bipolar disorder·        Post-traumatic stress disorder
·        Obsessive-compulsive disorder·        Schizophrenia
·        Blindness·        Drug addiction and alcoholism
·        Hearing impairments·        And many more…

 

Every case is situation-specific. By example, if you are suffer disability discrimination based on obesity or  from a substance abuse problem but are currently still using illicit drugs, you may not be covered. However, if you no longer use illegal drugs but need continued treatment for alcoholism and/or drug addiction, it may be considered a qualified condition. Speak to an experienced New York City, New Jersey or Philadelphia disability discrimination lawyer today to find out if you have a discrimination case worth pursuing.


What is a reasonable accommodation when it comes to an employment disability?

As long as the accommodation does not impose “undue hardship,” an employer must provide reasonable accommodations to disabled employees.  Under the ADA, reasonable accommodations are modifications or adjustments which enable a qualified applicant to perform his or her job, and be considered for that job in the first place. The modification should allow them to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of other workers.

If a company unjustly denies you reasonable accommodations, speak with one of our New York City, New Jersey or Philadelphia disability discrimination lawyers right away.


WHAT IS DISABILITY HARASSMENT?

While we as a society have made strides in creating workplaces safer and more accessible to employees with disability, unlawful discriminatory employment practices are still prevalent.

If you are disabled, it should not impact your ability to gain and maintain meaningful employment. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, New York Human Rights Law, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, and the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination, employers cannot treat qualified individuals differently because of a handicap, disability, or perceived disability. Further, employers must provide reasonable accommodations to disabled individuals.

Generally, unlawful discrimination refers to discrimination in the hiring, firing, and the conditions, compensation and privileges of employment, to include job training. Discrimination also refers to harassment within the workplace. These protections extend to asking for help; an employer cannot discriminate against any disabled person for requesting reasonable and legal medical leave or a reasonable accommodation.


CAN YOU GET FIRED IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY?

 Both Federal and State laws forbid an employer from firing an employee because the employee has a disability. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) set the bench marks for when an employer has impermissibly fired an employee based on a disability, except in cases where that disability will affect an essential job function.

As recently as 2016, the EEOC received an $8.6 million settlement of a disability suit after the Lowe’s fired thousands of workers with disabilities due to their rigid leave policies. Under this suit, the EEOC alleged Lowe’s violated the ADA by engaging in a pattern and practice of discrimination against their employees with disabilities when it fired them, and failed to provide reasonable accommodations when their medical leave of absences exceeded Lowe’s 180-day maximum leave policy. The EEOC also alleged Lowe’s fired many individuals who were regarded as disabled, had a record of disability and those who were associated with someone with a disability. David Lopez, General Counsel for the EEOC stated  the settlement sent a clear message to employers that violating the ADA by setting policies that limit the amount of leave, regardless of one’s disability status and automatically firing employees with disabilities once they reach this rigid, inflexible limit will be prosecuted by the  EEOC.

 


What is ADA in the workplace?

Enacted in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits employment discrimination against individuals with disabilities. A person is considered “disabled” under the ADA if he or she meets one of three statutory requirements. First, he or she may have “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.”  Or, they may have a record of, or be “regarded as” having such a disability. Thus, a person is “disabled,” within the meaning of the ADA if he or she has an impairment that actually substantially limits a major life activity, if the employee has a record showing that such a disability exists, or if the individual is perceived to have a disability, whether or not that disability severely limits a major life activity.

Given the above definition, any inquiry into an ADA claim will have two initial elements. First, the court must decide whether the claimed, actual, recorded or regarded disability limits a major life activity. Second, if there is a limitation of a major life activity, the court must decide whether such limitation is “substantial.”

Major life activities are broken into two categories: tasks and functions. Tasks are defined to include caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working. Functions, in turn, are defined as including but not limited to, functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions. Given these expansive (and non-exclusive) definitions, most ADA threshold inquiries will turn on whether the major life activity is substantially limited (rather than whether the limitation exists).

Under authority of the ADA, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has promulgated regulations to be used when determining whether a limitation of a major life activity is substantial. In this regard, the EEOC has directed that the phrase substantially limits should be construed broadly in favor of expansive coverage to the maximum extent permitted by the terms of the ADA.

To meet its broad definition of “substantially limits” the EEOC has explained that “impairment need not prevent, or significantly or severely restrict, the individual from performing a major life activity in order to be considered substantially limiting.”  Furthermore, both the ADA and the implementing regulations recognize that an “episodic” limitation may qualify an individual as disabled under the statute. However, duration of an impairment is a consideration in determining whether the impairment is substantial. Thus, where an impairment is expected to last for a short period of time, it likely will have to be more severe than a normal impairment to qualify an individual as disabled. Put differently, an impairment may substantially limit a major life activity, even if the restriction is not significant or severe, and even if the restriction is in remission.

It is important to note that the foregoing standard for proving a disability under the ADA represents the effect of dramatic changes to the statute brought about by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). Accordingly, in many situations, case law decided before the 2008 amendments may be inapplicable. Consultation with an experienced and knowledge ADA attorney is strongly suggested. The Derek Smith Law Group, PLLC has years of exprinece litigating claims under both the ADA and the ADAAA.


WHAT IS A REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION?

The term “reasonable accommodation” is hard to pin down. As long as the accommodation does not impose “undue hardship,” an employer must provide reasonable accommodations to disabled employees.  Under the ADA, reasonable accommodations are modifications or adjustments which enable a qualified applicant to perform his or her job, and be considered for that job in the first place. The modification should allow them to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of other workers.

The EEOC handles disability claims. For instance, in Banner Health, the EEOC resolved a charge by an employee that his employer refused his requests for reasonable accommodations and subsequently fired him because of his disability. The employee is intellectually disabled and had been working for the employer for decades. The Employee had after years of failed requests for reasonable accommodations, establishing a pattern of discrimination, the employer fired the employee. The EEOC was granted a consent decree and ordered the employer to pay $255,000 into a trust for the employee.

If a company unjustly denies you reasonable accommodations, speak with one of our New York City, New Jersey or Philadelphia disability discrimination lawyers right away.


HOW DOES AN EMPLOYEE FILE A CLAIM FOR DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION?

A claim for discrimination based on a disability can be filed with either a State of Federal agency. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is the federal agency  which typically handle federal claims. Some States have a “work-sharing agreement” by which a claim is filed with the EEOC but the states conduct the primary investigative role. In these states, it is generally unnecessary to file a claim with both agencies, so long as you state you will be making a “cross-claim” with the other agency when filing the initial claim.

While you may file a claim in the EEOC office located closest to  where you live, the claim may be investigated at the EEOC office located closest to where the discrimination occurred. For American employees working overseas, you may file with the office closest to your employer’s headquarters.

Depending on where the discrimination took place, it will affect an employee’s place of filing. Typically, a claim must be filed within 180 days of the act of discrimination, however that deadline is extended to 300 days if State or local agencies enforce state or local claims on the same basis as the federal law. It is important to note that the EEOC does not accept charges filed online, you may file in person or by mail.

This process can be daunting, if an employee feels as though they have a claim for discrimination, it is important to contact an attorney to help navigate the ins and outs of filing a disability claim.

 


WHAT ARE NYC LAW PROHIBITING DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION?

In conjunction with the ADA, the New York Human Rights Law (HLR) also safeguards the rights of disabled persons in NYC. In general, the HLR offers a broader range of employee disability protections. The HLR applies to all public employees in addition to private employers with four or more workers. Employment agencies and labor unions are covered under the HLR.

The ADA and HRL define disability slightly differently. Depending on your specific circumstances, your NYC discrimination attorney may decide to apply both laws to your case.

Under the HRL, a “handicap or disability” means you meet one of these requirements: a physical, mental or medical impairment resulting from anatomical, physiological, genetic or neurological conditions which prevents the exercise of a normal bodily function or is demonstrable by medically accepted clinical or laboratory diagnostic techniques; or a record of such an impairment; or a condition regarded by others as such an impairment.

According to the New York Human Rights Law, you do not have to show that your handicap substantially limits major life activities.

  


WHAT ARE THE NEW JERSEY LAWS PROHIBITING DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION?

 In an effort to combat the unscrupulous practice of discriminating against disabled employees, New Jersey has passed the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (LAD). The LAD forbids employers from discriminating against employees in job-related actions. This includes in recruitment, interviews, hiring, promotions, discharges, compensations and the terms, conditions and privileges of employment of any protected categories. These disabilities are not limited to purely mental and physical conditions, but also extend to ongoing diseases such as HIV and AIDS.

These protections not only cover policies as they are on the books, but also how they may impact affected groups. This means a policy that seems neutral on its face may, in fact, has an adverse impact on these protected groups, presenting a cause of action for an employee.  There are exceptions to this general principle. A policy that meets an important and legitimate business need does not create a case for a discrimination claim. For example, if an employer were to set a policy of  being able to lift a certain amount of weight, while this may exclude many people with disabilities, if the job were in a warehouse in which every employee is required to lift said weight, then it would be a legitimate business need and not subject to the LAD. It is on the burden of the employer to establish the policy has a legitimate business need.

 


WHAT ARE THE PENNSYLVANIA LAWS PROHIBITING DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION?

 The practice of discrimination against an individual based on a handicap, disability or any reasonable accommodation based on said handicap or disability, is of the utmost concern to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This type of discrimination causes domestic strife and unrest, threatening the rights and privileges of the Commonwealth, undermining the foundations of a free democratic state. The denial of equal opportunity of employment because of discriminatory practices, and failure to utilize the productive capacities of Pennsylvania citizens deprives large swaths of the population from maintaining a decent standard of living and often causes these individuals to burden the state with their basic care, instead of the uniquely American principle of self-determination. These practices often threatening the peace, health, safety and welfare of the Commonwealth.  The legislature of Pennsylvania was not deaf to the needs of its citizens and passed the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act (PHRA). The PHRA prevents employers from discriminating against an employee based on that employee having a non-job related disability.

Under the PHRA, a disability is defined as any handicap or disability, physical or mental, which substantially  limits one or more of such persons’ life activities; a record of having such an impairment or; being regarded as having such an impairment, but such term does not include current, illegal use of or addiction to, a controlled substance.

The Pennsylvania anti-discrimination statute provides greater coverage than applicable state law, creating a claim for workplaces with as few as four (4) employees, much lower than the fifteen (15) employee as required by federal law.

If you believe you have been unlawfully discriminated against because of your qualified disability, you must schedule an appointment with the PHRA within 180 days of the alleged act of discrimination, unless you have a reasonable excuse. If your claims are covered by Federal law, the PHRA will file your complaint with the appropriate agency.

After you complaint is filed, it will be assigned to the docket and served on the employer within thirty (30) days of docketing. The employer is required to answer your complaint within sixty (60) days of the date it was served.

Following filing, an investigation will begin. This will include the gathering of evidence by both parties, and a fact-finding conference. After the investigation, the commission will either find: no probable cause, lack of jurisdiction or will move to dismiss the complaint if they believe you do not have an actionable claim. However, the commission may find there is probable cause to move forward with the case, at this point employers often settle.  If you are unable to settle, the commission may grant a public hearing which may later be appealed to the Court of the Commonwealth.

 


Do not wait to speak with an New York, New Jersey or Philadelphia Disability Discrimination Attorney

A disability should never hinder your ability to succeed in the professional world. The New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey Disability Discrimination Attorneys at the employment law firm of the Derek T. Smith Law Group are your Number One resource for employment law conflicts in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island and throughout New York, New Jersey & Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We solely represent employees in disputes, staunchly advocating for Disability discrimination victims’ right to a fair workplace. Contact our office today for a FREE CONSULTATION with our disability discrimination attorneys at 877-469-5297 or online.

Disability Discrimination & ADA | New York City, New Jersey and Philadelphia Disability Discrimination Lawyers

   
New York Office
1 Pennsylvania Plaza, 49th fl.
New York City, NY 10119
Phone: 877-469-5297
Fax: 212-587-4169
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Philadelphia, PA Office
1845 Walnut Street,
Suite 1600
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-391-4790
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New Jersey Office | Hewitt
73 Forest Lake Drive
Hewitt, NJ 07421
Phone: 800-807-2209
Fax: 212-587-4169
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